Sunday, January 16, 2022

If It Breaks Then You Get To Keep Both Pieces

Back when I was young, I worked in the mainframe arena. There was lots of free software available. The saying that went along with that free software was:
If it breaks then you get to keep both pieces.
https://english.stackexchange.com/a/250982
Years later, I worked in the open systems arena as the Internet was emerging. And along with that revolution came "open source" software.

Our strategy group wouldn't let us use "open source" software.

With the recent log4j and NPM issues, finally I understand why.


Thank you, John O.

Sunday, January 09, 2022

USB-C vs Lightning

My last Android phone, the Essential PH-1, used USB-C. Obviously, my iPhone uses Lightning.

For my usage, they're pretty much the same. I just use the cable for charging. And I charge overnight.

But a couple of articles have raised my interest.

This comment triggered my research:
USB C sucks, Apple lighting is the best even tho I’m not a fan of apple, it’s so much more durable
USB C wins hands down on technology. This article (archive.is) does a good job of summarizing the technology.

But, look closely at the chart they used.


Vention doesn't mention that the representations of the "Interface drawing" are fundamentally different.

That "Interface" for the Lightning is inside the device. That "Interface" for the USB-C is dangling at the end of a cable.

Here's a real world example of the difference from reddit:
The apple phone charger chips or breaks and you get a new charging cable, the design is reversed for USB-C, so if the reciever [sic] in a device chips or breaks you now need to replace the reciever [sic] for a phone or other gadget instead of getting a new cable...
Pocketnow has some similar comments:
USB C's design protects the pins and connectors on cables, but there might be some durability concerns over the tab inside a device.
from Pocketnow.com

I think it's clear which will win in the long run but it's going to be like Beta vs VHS without the porn.


Sunday, December 26, 2021

Asus and Log4j

Surely you've heard of the Log4j vulnerability by now.

A recent podcast led me to investigate whether my Asus RT-AC68R was vulnerable. I've got a lot of Asus equipment.

I went to Asus' site and found their summary of "Affected Products & Services".


Nice.

Sunday, December 19, 2021

Keepass Revisited

The end of the year gets me to reminiscing. One issue that came to mind recently is Keepass. These posts cover all the mechanics. I have migrated from Dropbox to OneDrive for storage. While I casually use Google Chrome's password store, my serious encrypted store is Keepass.

It's flexibility lets me store notes.


I also use Keepass to save names and addresses.

I had been using a 16GB Transcend thumb drive for the last several years. Last week, when I tried to update Keepass, I got a message that the drive was write-protected. I could still read it. After an hour or so of playing with it I realized it was just worn out.

As I keep it on my keyring, I needed a small but sturdy replacement. I found this 32GB Kingston DataTraveler.


It works great for Keepass.

Sunday, December 05, 2021

Happy New Year 2022

The start of a new year is a good time to review a few things and make sure everything is right. Here's my list of things I think you should check once a year.


Some of the steps may be a little out of date but I think you can find your way around. If not, leave me a comment and I'll help.

PayPal Preapproved Payments
Offline Backup
Certificate Store
Router Configuration
Windows Defender and Windows Defender Offline
Controlled Folder Access
System Restore

You'll sleep better.

Sunday, November 28, 2021

Wyze Cam Plus Person Detection

As I've mentioned previously, I'm a big fan of Wyze products.

Initially, the Wyze cameras had on-camera person detection but a dispute with Xnor.ai forced Wyze to remove this.

This seemed like a bad thing but it has been good.

Wyze introduced a paid service called Cam Plus. It's cheap ($1.25 per month per camera) and from time to time, they offer deals. I got an annual package for 5 cameras for $49.99.

In addition to person detection, Cam Plus offers package detection, vehicle detection, and pet detection. It also removes the 5 minute "cool down" period and has unlimited video length.

You can see how this looks in the following event log.


From the bottom to the top, you can see my neighbor pull into my driveway, walk to the front door, carry the package around to the back porch, return to his car, and drive off.

Just FYI, for my last purchase, I got the Wyze Cam v3 ($33.59) and a Samsung 32GB MicroSD card ($8.55).

Sunday, November 21, 2021

Windows 10 21H2 Enablement Package

Windows 10 November 2021 Update, a.k.a. 21H2, doesn't have many new features, especially for the home user.
  • Adding WPA3 H2E standards support for enhanced Wi-Fi security
  • Windows Hello for Business introduces a new deployment method called cloud trust to support simplified passwordless deployments and achieve a deploy-to-run state within a few minutes
  • GPU compute support in the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) and Azure IoT Edge for Linux on Windows (EFLOW) deployments for machine learning and other compute intensive workflows

It hasn't shown up on ANY of my PCs so far. I always try to test new things so you don't have to. 21H2 is no exception.

Like 21H1, I found a link to download the enablement package. And like 21H1, when I clicked on that link, nothing happened. I had to right click and choose "Copy link address" and then paste that link into another browser tab.

Worked fine.